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Leadership Fundamentals Understanding Your Role (LFUYR -M1 )

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  1. Welcome
    LFUYR-M1 House Keeping
  2. LFYUR-M1 Qualification Summary
  3. Agenda
  4. Cases for Context
    Case 1
  5. Case 2
  6. Session 1: Managerial Foundations
    LFUYR-M1-S1L2 Supervising is a balancing act.
  7. Session 2: Knowing yourself
    Knowing yourself (LFUYR -M1 S2L1)
  8. Session 3: Working with your boss
    Working with your boss (LFUYR -M1 S2L1)
  9. Section 4: Managing Meetings
    Managing Meetings (LFUYR -M1 S4L1)
  10. Session 5: Organising for Success
    Organising for Success (LFUYR -M1 S5L1)
  11. Session 6: Making a smooth Transition (LFUYR -M1 S6L1 )
    Making a smooth transition into supervision (LFUYR -M1 S6L1)
  12. Skills Development – Supervisor Skills Assessment
    Skill Assessment (LFUYR -M1 Skills)

Going from employee to supervisor has always been a big one. Taking on new assignments, getting work done through others, shifting from being a buddy to a boss—any one of these transitions is a handful. Together, they can be overwhelming, as any novice supervisor—or first-time manager, for that matter—can tell you. 

 

In the past, new supervisors had some time during their first weeks and months on the job to pick up what they needed to know. There were people around—managers, other supervisors—who could show them the ropes, and even step in to help when the going got tough.  

 

Changes in the workplace have thrust these brand new managers of other people into positions of such pivotal importance that they have little time to get up to speed. First-time and experienced supervisors face a set of responsibilities they may not be prepared for—responsibilities that may in fact be at odds with the abilities and attributes that got them promoted into supervision in the first place. 

 

For many people, the difficulty of the job outweighs any excitement or pride 

they might feel in being promoted. Some long-standing challenges…  

 

A new supervisor’s first week on the job is almost always an eye-opening experience.  

Having observed their own supervisors in action, these novices often have a general  

idea of what’s involved. However, what they don’t know is what supervising feels 

like. Their efforts to find their footing are reflected in comments like the following: 

 

  • “Guys I’ve worked with for years look at me different now. I expected the kidding. What I didn’t expect was getting frozen out. Maybe this is what they mean when they say it’s lonely at the top.”
  • “I get pressure to improve production, so I pass it on—and get resented for it. But I guess that’s just part of my job now. You gotta be tough on people.”
  • “I miss doing my own work; it’s satisfying to know you’ve done something right. Now I spend all my time dealing with complaints and emergencies and everybody’s ‘issues.’ It never ends.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • “Management thinks they can cut back and still maintain good customer service. Well, they can’t—not unless every service rep works a lot harder. And then guess who gets the complaints? Guess who has to step in and take somebody’s shift when they don’t feel like showing up?”
  • “I wish everyone would realize I’m the same person I was before I became a supervisor.”
  • “No matter how much I go over instructions, some people will mess it up. I never did that when I had their job.”
  • “Where’s the work ethic any more, that’s what I’d like to know.”

 

Together, these comments describe a kind of balancing act starting supervisors must master if they are to successfully handle their new responsibilities. 

 

Supervising today’s work-force takes special skill and understanding. 

 

Supervisors need strategies they can master quickly. Strategies that will help them deal with the many problems and issues that inevitably arise.  

 

They want people skills they can put to immediate use—and then build on as they gain in experience and take on more responsibility. 

Going from employee to supervisor has always been a big one. Taking on new assignments, getting work done through others, shifting from being a buddy to a boss—any one of these transitions is a handful. Together, they can be overwhelming, as any novice supervisor—or first-time manager, for that matter—can tell you. 

 

In the past, new supervisors had some time during their first weeks and months on the job to pick up what they needed to know. There were people around—managers, other supervisors—who could show them the ropes, and even step in to help when the going got tough.  

 

Changes in the workplace have thrust these brand new managers of other people into positions of such pivotal importance that they have little time to get up to speed. First-time and experienced supervisors face a set of responsibilities they may not be prepared for—responsibilities that may in fact be at odds with the abilities and attributes that got them promoted into supervision in the first place. 

 

For many people, the difficulty of the job outweighs any excitement or pride 

they might feel in being promoted. Some long-standing challenges…  

 

A new supervisor’s first week on the job is almost always an eye-opening experience.  

Having observed their own supervisors in action, these novices often have a general  

idea of what’s involved. However, what they don’t know is what supervising feels 

like. Their efforts to find their footing are reflected in comments like the following: 

 

  • “Guys I’ve worked with for years look at me different now. I expected the kidding. What I didn’t expect was getting frozen out. Maybe this is what they mean when they say it’s lonely at the top.”
  • “I get pressure to improve production, so I pass it on—and get resented for it. But I guess that’s just part of my job now. You gotta be tough on people.”
  • “I miss doing my own work; it’s satisfying to know you’ve done something right. Now I spend all my time dealing with complaints and emergencies and everybody’s ‘issues.’ It never ends.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • “Management thinks they can cut back and still maintain good customer service. Well, they can’t—not unless every service rep works a lot harder. And then guess who gets the complaints? Guess who has to step in and take somebody’s shift when they don’t feel like showing up?”
  • “I wish everyone would realize I’m the same person I was before I became a supervisor.”
  • “No matter how much I go over instructions, some people will mess it up. I never did that when I had their job.”
  • “Where’s the work ethic any more, that’s what I’d like to know.”

 

Together, these comments describe a kind of balancing act starting supervisors must master if they are to successfully handle their new responsibilities. 

 

Supervising today’s work-force takes special skill and understanding. 

 

Supervisors need strategies they can master quickly. Strategies that will help them deal with the many problems and issues that inevitably arise.  

 

They want people skills they can put to immediate use—and then build on as they gain in experience and take on more responsibility. 

If I’d Only Known 

 

When AchieveGlobal asked managers what they wished they’d known when they first became supervisors.  Here’s a sampling of what they said: 

 

  • The corporate big picture and how to work it 
  • How to delegate 
  • How to win people over 
  • How to manage up 
  • The difference between earning respect and earning friendship 
  • How to trust my staff 

 

What Managers Expect from Supervisors 

 

With so many new and unfamiliar responsibilities threatening to overwhelm new supervisors, they want to know where to focus their efforts. 

 

Here are the issues managers identified, listed in the order of relative importance: 

 

Motivating others 

 

“Motivating is the key skill required in business,” said one U.K. manager. Described by another as “getting employees to believe in what they are doing,” managers put this skill at the top of their list. They recognize that in this day and age commitment, creativity, and extra effort are required from everyone if the organization is to achieve its goals. It’s not enough for employees to simply do their jobs; they must feel the motivation to go that extra mile.  

 

Adapting to new and changing situations—and helping others do the same 

 

What new supervisors define as confusing job responsibilities, managers see as managing change.  Managers know routine is a thing of the past. They want supervisors who feel comfortable dealing with the ambiguity and uncertainty that accompany change. “Frontline managers must be able to adapt to new and changing situations,” said one U.S. manager. They must also be prepared to “communicate changes and reasons for them to the organization’s people. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding the organization’s goals, and using them to motivate employees and determine work priorities 

 

Managers, who wished they’d known more about the corporate big picture when they started out, see this as even more critical for today’s new supervisors. They want supervisors who “are aware of the organization’s mission and goals,” who have a “knowledge of the core business of the company,” and who “understand the competitive environment they are operating in.”  

 

New supervisors are often unsure what they should be spending their time on 

 

They want to be told what to do, but sometimes there’s no one with the time to tell them—or no one who knows. The only fixed point is likely to be the department’s or organization’s goals or objectives. Everyone, supervisors included, needs to learn how to use them points of navigation—and as motivating descriptions of the future.